Minors in English and Minors directed by English Faculty


African-American Studies (contact Dr. Patricia Hopkins)
Childhood Studies (contact Dr. Kara Keeling)
Civic Engagement & Social Entrepreneurship (contact Dr. Roberta Rosenberg)
Film Studies (contact Dr. John Nichols)
Linguistics (contact Dr. Rebecca Wheeler)
Literature (contact Dr. Jean Filetti)
Renaissance & Medieval Studies (contact Dr. Sharon Rowley)
Women's & Gender Studies (contact Dr. Roberta Rosenberg)
Writing (contact Dr. Jean Filetti)


THE MINOR PROGRAM IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES  (18 credits)
Dr. Patricia Hopkins
Assistant Professor of English
594-7452
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African-American Studies

The minor in African-American Studies provides
students with a focused understanding of the vital role of
African-American culture and contributions in American
life.
    The interdepartmental and inter-disciplinary features
of the program allows for a broad and varied exposure
to North American Black culture, economics, politics,
and history from Africa to the Americas. Students will
acquire a basic knowledge of the African-American experience
by understanding that the racial system of the
United States was never simply black and white. Through
the prism of Black experiences, the courses shed light on
general principles of cultural pluralism, racial diversity,
and social stratification in the U.S. and other national and
transnational contexts relevant to the Black Diaspora.
Race is not something that affects only racial minorities,
for everyone in this country is viewed through the prism
of ideas about race. The African-American Studies minor’s
teaching places a special emphasis on reaching out
beyond those who make the field the focus of their study.
The course offerings are designed for a broad student
constituency interested in learning about Black experiences
and honing skills in critical thinking and effective
writing. The African-American Studies minor pairs well
with all majors. Consequently, everyone who has an interest
is not only invited to take on the minor, but strongly
encouraged.

Program Objectives:
1. Underscore the contributions of people of African
descent to American history and emphasize the
importance of diversity in American culture.
2. Cultivate students’ ability to think critically, to
express themselves effectively, and to respect
cultural and gender diversity.

Program Requirements:
Students should work with the Director to complete
program.
1. A minimum of 18 credits as listed below are
needed to complete the minor;
2. Core requirement: ENGL 345 or HIST 349 and
six additional credits (two courses);
3. Nine additional credits (three courses) from electives.
4. Courses from three different departments must be
represented in the 18 credits.
5. Twelve of the 18 credits (four courses) must come
from courses at the 300 or 400 level.

THE CURRICULUM IN
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES
The following course descriptions appear in appropriate
sections throughout the catalog.
Core
ENGL 345 African-American Literature and Culture
HIST 349 The Rise and Fall of American Slavery
HIST 355 Civil War and Reconstruction
PHIL 252 African Philosophy
SOWK 216 Diversity and Cultural Competence
SOCL 316 Minorities in Society
Elective
ENGL 330 Language and Culture
ENGL 342 American Literature, 1850-1920
ENGL 343 American Literature, 1920-present
ENGL 381 The Roaring Twenties: Film, Literature, and
Drama of the Jazz Age
GOVT 204 Hate Crime Realities and Consequences
GOVT 316 Constitutional Law
HIST 357 Twentieth Century American, 1920-1960
HIST 370 Twentieth Century Africa
HIST 473W Major Themes in Contemporary African
History
MUSC 408 Jazz History and Literature
PHIL 383 Applied Social Ethics
SOCL 205 Identity, Community, and the Individual
SOCL 303 The Family in Transition
SOCL 304 Socialization and Society
University Catalog for African-American Studies (.pdf)


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Childhood Studies Minor
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Dr. Kara Keeling, Director
Professor of English
(757) 594-7952

 The Minor Program in Childhood Studies (18 credits)
Christopher Newport University offers a multi-disciplinary
minor in childhood studies for undergraduates. The
program is designed to meet the following student goals:
1. Provide a body of knowledge about children and
adolescents combined with skills obtained from the
student’s major discipline to prepare for careers in
teaching, social work, counseling, administrative
positions in community programs for children and
adolescents, juvenile justice programs, and others.
2. To serve as a minor for the student who has no career
goals in the field but has an interest in the study of
childhood. Any of the courses may be taken without
commitment to the entire program.
 Program Requirements:
Students should seek advising from the Director of
the Childhood Studies program in choosing the courses
for the minor.
1. A minimum of 18 credits as listed below are required
to complete the minor.
2. Core requirement: IDST 210.
3. Select five courses (15 credits) from the approved
elective list. To preserve the interdisciplinary nature
of the minor, no more than two courses may come
from the same discipline.
4. Special topics and other courses may be used if approved
by the director.
5. Occasional special topics courses (295, 395, 495)
from BUSN, GOVT, PSYC, SOWK, as well as new
courses may be credited toward the minor if they have
the approval of the director.
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MINOR IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT & SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
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Co-directors:
Dr. Roberta Rosenberg
Stephanie Huneycutt Bardwell, LL.M., J.D.

Director, Professor of English
(757) 594-7149
(18 credits)
Flyer about requirements & electives (.pdf)

Faculty resources for Service-Learning

Civic EngagementThe Minor in Civic Engagement and Social Entrepreneurship (CESE) is an interdisciplinary program open to all students interested in issues of social and political justice; business and economic opportunity; equal access to education, health care and the arts; and/or environmental conservation as well as cross-cultural understanding both within the United States and internationally.

Through interdisciplinary study and service, students will become proactive citizens who find creative and practical solutions to local, national and global problems. Students will be able to use their liberal arts education in combination with a variety of business, writing and research skills to create an original project that will seek to remedy clearly defined social, cultural or economic problems.

This program is primarily intended for students who have an interest in social entrepreneurship and community service and who desire interdisciplinary knowledge which can transform and make a difference in society.

Program Objectives:
1. To provide students with the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills needed to study, research and  find innovative solutions to contemporary problems.
2. To help students to understand social entrepreneurship  theory and development as it is practiced locally, nationally and globally.
3. To offer students an opportunity to study contemporary issues and their solutions through community based problem solving and service learning.

Program Requirements:
Students will work with the Director to select courses, a community agency and complete the program.

1. A minimum of 18 credits are required to complete the minor, including a capstone off-campus partnership with a community agency.
2. Core requirements: SOWK 216, 470; Engl 454; and BUSN 340.
3. Select two approved electives (6 credits) in a field of special interest from two different disciplines.
4. Special Topics and other courses can be used if approved by the Director.

THE CURRICULUM IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
The following course descriptions appear in appropriate sections throughout the catalog.

Core Courses (12 credits)

BUSN 340 Non-Profit as Business Enterprise
ENGL 454 Public Relations and Grants: Writing for  Civic Engagement
SOWK 216 Diversity and Cultural Competence
IDST 470 Seminar in Civic Engagement & Social Entrepreneurship

Electives (select 3 courses)

(For additional courses and Special Topics, check with the Director)

BIOL 115 Topics in Ecology and the Environment
BUSN 441 Small Business Institute
GOVT 215 Comparative and International Politics
HIST 341 The Long Civil Rights Movement
HIST 374 Americans Meet the World
LDSP 384 Leading Change
MUSC 261 Opera Workshop
PHIL 304 Ethics and Current Value Questions
PHIL 315 Philosophy of Gender
PHIL 383 Applied Social Ethics
PSYC 303 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
PSYC 304 Social Psychology
PSYC 313 Human Relations in Organizations
PSYC 340 Adult Development and Aging
PSYC 521* Reading Acquisition and Development
RSTD 318 Theologies of Religious Pluralism
SOCL 305 Sociology of Aging
SOCL 314 Education, Culture and Society
SOCL 315 Sociology of Health and Health Care
SOCL 316 Racial and Ethnic Relations
SOCL 318 Social Problems
SOCL 375 Social Class in Modern Society
SOCL 377 Women, Gender, and Culture
SOWK 200 Volunteer Services
SOWK 330 The Impact of AIDS
SOWK 369 Child and Family Welfare
SOWK 383 International Human Relations

* graduate level course


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FILM STUDIES MINOR
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Dr. John G. Nichols,

Director
Associate Professor of English
(757) 594-8896

What kinds of courses are required?
6 interdisciplinary courses
• Writing About Film
• A minimum of four other courses
approved by the Film Studies director.

15 credit hours (min.)


The Minor/Certificate Program in Film Studies
As an artistic medium, film explores the complexity of
society through its many cultural uses, serving as a source
of entertainment, a pinnacle of artistic experimentation, an
instrument of social persuasion, and an interdisciplinary
art form. Film courses in this program offer students the
opportunity to participate in critical conversations about
film, enhancing liberal arts learning by emphasizing
strategies for close analysis, historical inquiry, narrativity,
and philosophical thinking.
The interdisciplinary film minor/certificate program
invites students to examine critically the cultural production
and reception of film. Students in the program will analyze
film style, explore the intersection of film and society,
inquire into the making of film, learn strategies for writing
about film, and investigate film’s relations with other
disciplines. (Any of the courses may be taken without
commitment to the entire program.)

Program Objectives:
1) Investigate historical moments of cinematic
production and reception as well as film’s
interdisciplinary relations.
2) Serve as a minor for students who wish to extend
their work in a major to include film.
3) Offer a certificate program for students to
emphasize their concentrated study of film (for a
career in film or graduate studies in film).
Program Requirements:
1) ENGL 356W is required of all students in the
program.
2) A minimum of 15 approved program credits is
required to complete the minor and to obtain
certification.
3) In addition to the courses listed below, certain
internships, independent studies, and special
topics courses focusing on film may also count
toward the minor/certificate as determined by the
Film Studies Director.
4) Students should consult the Film Studies Director
on matters of course selection and advising.

THE CURRICULUM IN FILM STUDIES
The designation “MW” means that at least
one-third of the course reading involves
works by minority and women writers.

COMM 350. Media Criticism (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: COMM 201, 249 or 250.
Spring, alternate years.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to methods
of media criticism that will increase media literacy by
allowing students to analyze and critically process mediated
experiences in everyday life. Students will engage
contemporary examples of film, television, and other
media through a critical lens. The course emphasizes the
infl uence of social, economic, political, and technological
forces on content, strategies/marketing, and critical analysis
employed by scholars and media practitioners.

COMM 395. Special Topics (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: COMM 201, 249, 250.
Fall or Spring.
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty. This course’s topics
vary each semester; consequently, only those topics that
involve film, such as documentary, will be credited toward
the film studies minor.

ENGL 271. The Arthurian Legend in Fiction and
Film (3-3-0) WST
Prerequisite: ENGL 123.
This course studies the origins of the Arthurian Legend
in medieval Wales, England, Ireland and France, then
explores the ways in which the legend was transmitted and
transformed through the 20th century. Students will read and
discuss primary and secondary texts to explore issues such
as the relationship between myth, legend, history, fiction,
and folklore; national identity and ideals of kingship; heroes
and heroic identity; as well as medievalism, and the uses
of the past. Students will write a few informal essays, a
research paper, and two exams.

ENGL 320W. Studies in Women and Literature - WI
(3-3-0) (MW) GMP
Prerequisite: ENGL 123, ULLC 223.
Students will analyze the infl uence of gender on literary
texts by and about women. The focus will vary from
semester to semester and may include historical surveys,
major authors, genres and special topics including motherhood;
marriage and the family; sexuality; the nature
of work; religion and spirituality and literary theory on
women and gender. Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive
Requirement.

ENGL 324. Vampires: Representing Power, the Self, and
the Other in World Literature and Film (3-3-0) GMP
Prerequisite: ENGL 208 with a minimum grade of C-.
This course will provide students with the opportunity
to study images of vampires across time and cultures.
It explores the ways in which vampire narratives raise
questions about power and place, whether in relation to
gender roles and social position, invasion and conquest,
or economic conditions. Students will also examine the
relationship between high and popular culture, folklore,
religion and ritual, myth and legend. Students will write
two exams, a proposal, and a research paper.

ENGL 356W. Writing about Film-WI (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 123, ULLC 223.
This course offers students the opportunity to hone their
analytic writing skills by investigating the artistic and
cultural construction of films and how writers write about
film. This course is required for the film studies minor.
Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 380. Film and Literature (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 208 with a minimum grade of C-.
This course investigates the myriad ways film and literature
may be understood as conversant, symbiotic, and even
combative mediums. The relationships between film and
literature will be examined in terms of how one is adapted
into the other, how both represent the cultural concerns
of a particular historical moment, and how each depend
upon and enhance certain stylistic strategies of narrative
and non-narrative storytelling. This course counts toward
credit in the film studies minor.

ENGL 381. The Roaring Twenties: Film, Literature,
and Drama of the Jazz Age (3-3-0) WST
Prerequisites: ENGL 208 with a minimum grade of C- or
consent of the instructor.
Flappers, fast cars, mass media, World War I, the avantgarde,
the Harlem Renaissance – this course examines
this decade’s fast-paced intensity in the United States and
Europe and its wide cultural influence.

ENGL 395. Special Topics (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 208 with a minimum grade of C-.
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty. English majors
may enroll only once for credit. Only topics that involve
film will count toward the film minor.

ENGL 415. Studies in Literary Genre (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 308W with a minimum grade of C- or
consent of instructor.
Study of the concept and practice of literary genre through
analysis of works drawn from the American, British, or
world literary traditions Course material, which will vary
based on the interests of the instructor, may include drama,
epic, lyric, novel, romance, satire, tragedy, short story, and
linked/framed narrative. Only the focus on satire will count
toward the film minor.

HIST 325. Cold War Politics and Culture (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: HIST 112 or junior standing or consent of
instructor.
Fall and Spring.
This course examines the Cold War (1945-1991) from the
perspectives of both Soviet and US politics and culture.
Students will consider the era’s major political and military
events and build on the chronological narrative with study
of the Cold War’s cultural and intellectual impact on the
combatants.

HIST 327. History on Film (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: History 111 or junior standing or consent
of instructor.
Spring and Summer.
An analysis in depth of the relationship between film
and historical record. In conjunction with lectures and
class discussions, students will view and analyze classic
popular fictional films as well as political, documentary and
propaganda films. The course will focus on understanding
the sometimes blurred lines between history and fiction
or “docu-drama” written for political or social purposes.
Films examined in the course will vary from term to term
and there are sometimes specific themes in a particular
term. A typical course may include Ingmar’s Bergman’s
The Seventh Seal; Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will;
Inherit the Wind; Spartacus; The Crucible; Gandhi; Nixon;
JFK; The Paths of Glory; The Life of Emile Zola; and
Schindler’s List.

HIST 395. Special Topics (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: HIST 111 or 112 or 121 or 122 or junior
standing or consent of instructor.
Fall, Spring or Summer.
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty. A maximum of six
hours in HIST 395/495 may be offered toward completion
of major requirements. Only topics that involve film will
count toward the film minor.

HIST 428. WI:History of Propaganda: A Film Study
Course (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 123; ULLC 223; HIST 111 or junior
standing.
Fall, Spring, and Summer.
A historical survey on film and in the other visual arts of
military, political, religious, and social propaganda and
public enlightenment. After a brief survey of propaganda
in earlier times, the course covers the period from the
French Revolution to the present. The emphasis in the
course is on European propaganda, although America and
other areas of the world will be covered as well. Students
will analyze, critique, and examine propaganda in various
formats and also write on films screened in class or viewed
outside of class. Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive
requirement.

HIST 495. Special Topics (3-3-0)
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty. A maximum of
six hours in HIST 395 and/or 495 may be offered toward
completion of major requirements.

MLAN 207. History of German Cinema (3-3-0) CXP
This course will examine the cinematic traditions that have
developed in German-speaking countries. Representative
works will be screened and discussed from the Weimar
era, the Third Reich, the German Democratic Republic,
the New German Cinema, and post-reunification Germany.
Lectures and discussions will provide the students with the
historical background necessary to analyze the films in their
cultural context. Lectures/discussions in English. Films will
be shown in the original language with English subtitles.
3 hours of lecture/discussion per week; one required film
screening per week.

MLAN 217. International Film Traditions: Italy
(3-3-0)
This course will offer an historical overview of Italian
cinema from the origins to the present. It will introduce
students to the masterpieces of Italian cinema, with
examples from the silent era, Neorealism, art films, and the
newer trends, and will hone the analytical skills necessary
to read and critically analyze a film. A short film project
may be part of the course requirement (no video skills are
necessary). Lectures/discussions in English. Films will
be shown in the original language with English subtitles.
3 hours of lecture/discussion per week; one required film
screening per week. This course may be counted toward
the Film Studies minor.

MUSC 205. Genre and Genius: Collaboration and
Transcendence in Movie Music (3-3-0) CXP
Fall and Spring.
The course is intended to give students a greater appreciation
of cinema (movies and video)by exploring the concept of
‘genre’ in movie music and discovering how ‘genius’ might
emerge from the collaborative process between director
and composer.

PHIL 326W. Philosophy in the Movies-WI (3-3-0)
Prerequisites: ENGL 123, ULLC 223, and junior
standing.
Offered at least once every other year.
A philosophical and experiential exploration of philosophical
concepts within popular film. Course will focus on different
themes each time it is taught. Themes will include images
of good and evil, images of the future, science, technology,
and humanities’ relationship to the environment; images
of women, love and sex; images of justice, the law, and
the cosmos. Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive
Requirement.

RSTD 326W. Religion in the Movies-WI (3-3-0)
Prerequisites: ENGL 123, ULLC 223 and junior
standing.
Offered at least once every other year.
A theoretical and experiential exploration of religious
concepts within popular films. Concepts considered
will include: Rudolph Otto’s Mysterterium Tremendum
et Fascinans, film as postmodern bard, sacred time
and space, spiritual journey, spiritual mediation, icons,
hierophanic phenomena, transcendence, and Paul
Schrader’s understanding of Transcendental Style in
Film. Theories of religious experience from the following
authors will be integrated into the examination of film as
a medium of religious communication: Rudolph Otto,
Mircea Eliade, Peter Berger, Clifford Geertz, Walter Ong,
Marshall McLuhan, Evelyn Underhill and Paul Schrader.
Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive Requirement.

THEA 361W. Broadway to Hollywood and Back-WI
(3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 123, ULLC 223.
Alternate Years.
Since the advent of the talkies, plays of all types have been
regularly adapted for presentation as film. As storytelling
mediums, film and theater share many similarities but are,
at heart, vastly different art forms in terms of their texts,
modes of presentation, and audience sensibilities. This
writing intensive (WI) course examines famous plays of
all genres, classics, musicals, dramas, and comedies and
uses their transformations from stage to screen as a basis
to appreciate dramatic literature and to compare both art
forms. The more recent trend of transforming films into
plays is also examined. Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive
Requirement.

Participating Faculty
Dr. Laura Deiulio (Modern and Classical Languages and
Literature), Dr. Eric Duskin (History), Prof. George Hillow
(Theater), Dr. Michaela D.E. Meyer (Communication
Studies), Dr. John Nichols (English), Dr. Kip Redick
(Philosophy and Religious Studies), Dr. Roberta Rosenberg
(English/Women’s and Gender Studies), Dr. Sharon
Rowley (English), Dr. Anthony Santoro (History), Dr.
Roberta Tabanelli (Modern and Classical Languages and
Literature), Dr. George Teschner (Philosophy and Religious

Studies), Dr. Joseph White (Music).

 

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LINGUISTICS MINOR
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Dr. Rebecca Wheeler

Professor of English
594-8889

The Minor Program in Linguistics
(15 credits)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language. Language, an arbitrary, symbolic signaling system is the major cognitive ability distinguishing human beings from all other animals. As a discipline, linguistics examines the structural components of language  [i.e., phonetics (sound), phonology, morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (meaning)], the conventions of language use (pragmatics) and the precise interplay among them. The discipline explores language in society, the nature of language variation and issues of power, prestige, and prejudice accruing to language use.

The interdisciplinary linguistics minor anchors in two foundation courses, Introduction to Linguistics and a course in the Structure of Language (in English, French, German, Spanish or Latin). Students then explore how a linguistically informed approach to language fuels both theoretical and applied inquiry in diverse disciplines. For example, Sociology and Anthropology explore cultural and ethnic differences in communicative style and language use around the world; Psychology explores child language acquisition, language and the brain, and the psychology of language; Computer Science might examine the syntactically and semantically well formed expressions in the artificial language of Java, and Philosophy explores different theories of the nature and structure of language and the role that language plays in determining what is counted as truth, knowledge, and reality.

Students will learn how to uncover assumptions about language, they will learn how to make, test and revise hypotheses, and how to construct logical arguments pertaining to the nature of language. In this way, the Linguistics Minor supports our liberal arts mission as students further deepen skills of critical thinking and analysis.

Program Objectives:
1.  Combine two focused foundation courses with the depth offered in more or advanced courses.
2.  Complement work done in the student’s major by offering a focus on Linguistics that is otherwise unavailable. Students of any major may take the minor in Linguistics but it may be of particular interest to majors in English; Philosophy and Religious Studies; Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Fine Art and Art History; Psychology; Communication Studies; Sociology, and Anthropology and Social Work.

Program requirements
1.    ENGL 310 “Introduction to Linguistics” is required of all students in the minor.
2.    Successful completion of three credits in the structure of language, either English or a foreign language. Thus, students in the minor will select one course among the following: ENGL 430, FREN 301, GERM 301, SPAN 301 or LATN 200.
3.    Three program electives (9 credits) from the approved list from two different disciplines. (A discipline is defined by the course prefix, i.e. PHIL and RSTD are two different disciplines).
4.    Certain independent studies, special topics courses, and study abroad courses focusing on linguistics topics may count toward the minor requirements as determined by the Director.
5.    Students should consult the Director on matters of course selection and advising.

THE CURRICULUM IN LINGUISTICS

Course descriptions appear in appropriate sections throughout the catalog.

Required Core (2 courses as specified)
ENGL 310    Introduction to Linguistics
ENGL 430 The Structure of English
FREN 301 Grammar and Composition
GERM 301 Grammar and Composition
SPAN 301 Grammar and Composition
LATN 200 Latin and Its Living Legacy

Program Electives

MLAN 311: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
ENGL 312    History of the English Language
SOCL/ANTH 330 Language and Culture    
PHIL 205    The Anatomy of Thought
PHIL 215    Philosophy and Literary Theory
PHIL 307    Current Trends in Modern Thought
PHIL 359    Philosophy of Language
PSYC 208    Child Development
PSYC 316    Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 428/L Cognitive Development /Lab
CPSC 250    Computers and Programming

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LITERATURE MINOR
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Dr. Jean Filetti
Associate Professor of English
What kinds of courses are required?

The Minor in Literature (21 credit hours)
The minor in literature requires successful completion
of the following courses with the grade of C- or better:
1. ENGL 200, 201, 202;
2. Four additional courses (12 credits) selected from the
following: ENGL 304W, 308W, 313, 315, 316, 320W,
324, 341, 342, 343, 345, 346, 356W, 372, 373, 374,
380, 381, 393, 394, 395 (topics in literature only),
410, 412, 415, 428, 429, 476, 495 (topics in literature

only), 499, 512, 514.

_________________________________________________________
MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES
Dr. Sharon M. Rowley, Director
McMurran Hall, Room 209
(757) 594-7024
srowley@cnu.edu
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The Minor Program in Medieval and Renaissance
Studies (18 credits)
We look back to the Middle Ages for the origins
of contemporary Western civilization and the Liberal
Arts, and to the Renaissance to learn about western expansion,
humanism and creativity. The Medieval and
Renaissance Studies minor brings together a dynamic
set of courses across several departments, allowing
students to explore the ways in which the legacies of
Medieval and Renaissance arts, history, literature and
theater, as well as philosophical, theological and political
thought have helped to shape our modern world.
Medieval and Renaissance minors will consider the
world in which they live, as well as their place in that
world, from a trans-historical and multi-disciplinary
perspective. The MRST minor is open to all, but will
appeal especially to students majoring in art, art history,
English, government, history, modern and classical languages,
music, philosophy, religious studies and theater.

Program Objectives:
1. To promote interdisciplinary and trans-historical study
of Medieval and Renaissance literature, culture, language
and history at CNU.
2. To encourage students to explore the richness and diversity
of the arts and humanities through an investigation
of the pre-modern periods of Western art, thought
and civilization. This minor will encourage students to
think more broadly, historically and creatively about
topics they are learning in their majors.

Program Requirements:
1. MRST 200 Medieval and Renaissance Perspectives
2. Successful completion of five electives from the
MRST curriculum, selected from at least three different
areas (art history, history, language, literature,
philosophy, religious studies or theater); at least
three of these courses should be at the 300-400 level.
3. Certain study abroad, special topics or independent
study courses may count toward the minor
requirement of electives at the director’s discretion.
4. Students should meet with the director for advising
and course selection.

THE CURRICULUM IN MEDIEVAL AND
RENAISSANCE STUDIES
MRST 200 Medieval and Renaissance Perspectives
(3-3-0) AIWT
An interdisciplinary and trans-historical course examining
the cultures of Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Students
will learn about the foundations of western art, thought
and culture: scholasticism, humanism and the Liberal Arts;
Christianity, the Reformation and Islam; chivalry, feudalism
and warfare; pandemic and plague; architecture and
city-planning. These concepts will be studied through the
lenses of Medieval and Renaissance arts, literature, history,
theater, philosophy and theology.

Electives
The following course descriptions appear in the appropriate
sections throughout the catalog.
CLST 201 The Mythic Imagination
ENGL 221 Shakespearean Inspirations
ENGL 271 Arthurian Legend in Fiction and Film
ENGL 372 The Metaphysics of Love in British Literature
ENGL 373 Myth, Legend and Romance in Medieval Britan
ENGL 421 Shakespeare 1 (offered every year)
FNAR 202 Survey of World Art II
FNAR 373 Italian Renaissance Art
FNAR 376 Medieval Art
FNAR 378 Baroque Art
FNAR 379 Northern Renaissance Art
FREN 351 Studies in the Early Modern Era
FREN 354 French Women Writers
GERM 311 German Cultural History
GERM 351 Studies in the Early Modern Era
HIST 111 Ancient & Medieval World
HIST 308 Tudor and Stuart Britain
HIST 310 The Reformation Era
HIST 313 British Empires, 1500-present
HIST 365 History of Islam
HIST 488 Women in Early Modern Europe
HNRS 321 Myths of Transformation
LATN 200 Latin and Its Living Legacy
MLAN 211 The Culture and Civilization of Italy
PHIL 201 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 202 Modern Philosophy
PHIL 349 Islamic Philosophy
PHIL 451 The Great Philosophers
RSTD 212 Religions of the West
RSTD 312 Religion and the Arts
THEA 310 Classical Theatre History
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WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES 
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Dr. Roberta Rosenberg

Professor of English


594-7149

What kinds of courses are required?
5 interdisciplinary courses (min.)
• Philosophy of Feminism (PHIL 315)
• A minimum of four other approved courses
• Courses from at least three different departments must be included in the minimum of 15 total credit hours.

15 credit hours (min.)

Women's & Gender Studies Minor requirements are described below.

What specific courses are required?


The Minor/Certificate Program in Women’s and
Gender Studies (15 credits, min.)
The Minor/Certificate Program in women’s and gender
studies brings together those courses offered by the University
which focus upon questions of gender, giving students
the opportunity to explore relationships among genders,
through concentrated study across several diverse fields.

Program Objectives:
1) To provide students with a multi-disciplinary perspective
regarding issues of gender (drawing upon
such fields as English, philosophy, anthropology,
sociology, social work, psychology, government,
and communications).
2) To offer a minor for students who wish to enrich
their major field of study through a study of gender roles.

 3) To offer a certificate program for students to emphasize
their concentrated study of these issues (for

use in career or graduate school goals).
Program Requirements:
1) A minimum of 15 credits in those courses deemed
part of the program (listed below) are required to
complete the minor and to obtain certification.
2) PHIL 315 or COMM 330 or equivalent is required
of all students in the program.
3) Courses from three different departments must be
represented in the minimum 15 credits.
4) Three courses must be taken from the program’s
core curriculum.
5) Two additional courses may be chosen from the
program’s core or elective curriculum (also listed
below).
6) Students should work with the Director to complete
the program.

THE CURRICULUM IN WOMEN’S AND
GENDER STUDIES
Courses focus one-third to three-fourths of their material
on women/gender issues:
The designation “MW” means that at least one-third
of the course reading involves works by minority
and women writers.

CLST 213. Women in Ancient Greece and Rome
(3-3-0) IIS
This course will introduce students to the highly structured
world of Greek and Roman women: wealthy and poor,
young and old, married and unmarried. Students will
examine literary representations of women – their goals
and strategies, motives and choices, personal and social
concerns – and evaluate their experiences within the
context of the historical documents of antiquity and in the
light of contemporary values. Topics for consideration
include: personal identity and social constructs, gender
and sexuality, religion and politics.

COMM 330. Gender Communication (3-3-0) IIS
Prerequisite: COMM 201, sophomore standing.
Fall and Spring.
This course includes both theory and practice. Subjects
include images and self-perceptions of men and women,
self-disclosure, language uses of the sexes, interpersonal
attraction, nonverbal codes, intimate and public contexts.

ENGL 320W. Studies in Women and Literature-WI
(3-3-0) (MW) GMP
Prerequisites: ENGL 123, ULLC 223.
Students will analyze the infl uence of gender on literary
texts by and about women. The focus will vary from
semester to semester and may include historical surveys,
major authors, genres and special topics including motherhood;
marriage and the family; sexuality; the nature
of work; religion and spirituality and literary theory on
women and gender. Partially satisfies the Writing Intensive
Requirement.

ENGL 412. Multicultural American Literature (3-3-0)
(MW)
Prerequisite: ENGL 308 with a minimum grade of C-.
Study of writers who have added their voices to Multi- cultural
American literature. Analysis of the works by writers
such as Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, August Wilson, Amy
Tan, Louise Erdrich, and others will illuminate the infl uence
of race, class, gender, and ethnicity upon the writer’s sense
of self, family, and community.
ENGL 425. Cultural Studies in World Literature
(3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ENGL 308W with a minimum grade of C-.
Intensive study of literature in the context of the culture
that produced it. Topics may include the effects of religion,
race, gender, religion, ethnicity, and class. Selections from
the following regions: Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin
America, United States, and Western Europe.


GOVT 382. Women and Politics (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: ULLC 223.
Spring.
This course introduces students to the various roles of
women in American politics. It covers a wide range of
topics from the history of women’s involvement in politics
in America to the future of women in politics. Other topics
covered include: feminist theories, women’s political participation,
and contemporary public policies of particular
interest to women. Overall, the course investigates the
role women have played in shaping the American political
system and the significant political accomplishments
of women.


PHIL 315. Philosophy of Gender (3-3-0) IIS
Prerequisite: ULLC 223.
Course will focus upon recent literature in the philosophy of
Feminism. Feminist critiques of knowledge, metaphysics,
history, morality, philosophical anthropology, and social
institutions will be examined and discussed. Course will
deal with such topics as ideals of masculinity and femininity,
feminine and masculine paradigms, the social construction
of reality, human nature, reason, sex and gender,
ego and self, autonomy, caring and maternal thinking, the
implications of feminist thought for concepts of language,
authorship, literature, and the feminist claims concerning
the epistemological role of theory, practice and experience.
The philosophy of non-Western cultures will be considered
in the light of the feminist critique.

PHIL 319. Philosophy of Love and Sexuality (3-3-0) IIS
Prerequisite: ULLC 223.
Alternate years.
This course will trace the development of the concept of
Eros (sexual love, desire) through selected readings from
the Western philosophical tradition. Topics to be covered
include the attainability of “true love,” the ethical imperatives
of faithfulness and monogamy, the roles of masculinity
and femininity, and the categorization of “normal” and
“abnormal” sexual behavior. This course will focus upon
several issues: 1) why the question of Eros is fundamentally
a question of human existence; 2) why certain sexual
values have become privileged in our culture; and 3) if
these values are conducive to living a good life. Authors to
be studied include Plato, Augustine, Freud, Jung, Kristeva,
Sartre, deBeauvoir, and Merleau-Ponty.

PSYC 420. Human Sexuality (3-3-0) IIS
Prerequisite: PSYC 201-202.
The area of human sexuality includes subject matter
from several disciplines and this course will deal with
various aspects of the multidisciplinary nature of Human
Sexuality. The course will explore the cultural and
cross-cultural treatment of one of the most fundamental
aspects of human nature, but an aspect long repressed by
many conservative institutions of Western Civilization.
An important goal of this course is to help the student
communicate easily, accurately, and comfortably when
discussing sexually related topics. Another major goal
of this course is the recognition and understanding of
sexual variation and dysfunction. Finally, this course will
examine the importance of developmental processes in our
understanding of normal sexual expression.

SOCL 303. The Family in Transition (3-3-0)
Prerequisite: any SOCL or ANTH 200 level course.
Fall and Spring.
The application of sociological theory and research to U.S.
marriage and family issues from a social change perspective.
Emphasis is placed on changing gender roles and
diversity in families. Variations in norms by social class,
race, ethnicity, and family structure are presented.

SOCL 395. Special Topics (Credits vary)
Prerequisite: any SOCL or ANTH 200 level course.
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty.

ANTH 377. Women , Gender, and Culture (3-3-0)
[Same as SOCL 377]
Prerequisite: any SOCL or ANTH 200 level course.
This course introduces the socio-cultural construction of
gender within a globalizing economic and political environment.
A variety of feminist perspectives will be studied
to illustrate the diversities of women’s, experiences that
shape their knowledge and behavior. Recurrent themes in
women’s studies, women’s movements, and women’s lives
will be examined, as will be the processes through which
the voices of women in dominant countries, classes and
cultures have been heard over those of women of lesser
privilege.

SOWK 395. Special Topics (Credits vary)
Prerequisite: SOWK 260, junior standing or consent of
department.
Topics vary, determined by the special interests and needs
of students and the expertise of faculty.

PSYC320: Psychology of Gender
This is a discussion-based survey course that examines psychological
theories and research on gender similarities and gender differences. Topics include social and biological influences on gender roles,
behavior, and ability, and research on gender and mental/physical
health, sexuality, relationships, and equality in the workplace. The
course will critically evaluate empirical data on sexual stereotypes,
and explore how assumptions about gender have real-world consequences. The course will help you recognize the influence of gender in your daily
life, develop self-awareness and insight into your experience as a
gendered being, and appreciate the complexity of gender in different
cultures. We will interpret & evaluate information from a variety of
sources, and discuss how to transform knowledge and beliefs into action.
The course format includes formal lectures, but focuses primarily on
group discussions, reflective writing, a research project, and group
work, including class presentations. Central questions of the course include: In what ways are men and women different?
What causes those differences?
How and when are those differences meaningful?

Prerequisites: PSYC 201 & 202


Elective Curriculum
Courses focus one-half to two-thirds of their material
on Women/Gender issues: ENGL 314W, 315; GOVT
375; PHIL 383, 386; PSYC 309, 340; SOCL 361; SOWK
369, 406W.
Special Topics courses will also be developed for
this minor. See Dr. Rosenberg if you would like to have

another course considered for the minor.

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WRITING MINOR

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The Minor in Writing (18 credits)


Writing courses develop students’ interests in imaginative
and professional writing. The Writing Minor emphasizes
creative writing and professional writing skills, giving
students important contexts for understanding human
experience and assuming leadership roles in civic society.

The writing minor requires the successful completion (with
a grade of C- or better) of any six courses (18 credit hours)
selected from: ENGL 250, 309W, 339W, 350, 351W, 352,

353W, 430, 452W, 453, 454W, 462, 491, 499.