Sociology Major

CNU offers a B.A. in Sociology with concentrations in criminology and anthropology.  Sociologists have careers in civil service, public relations, personnel/human relations and a variety of other fields.  Today's employers are looking for creativity, innovation and critical thinking skills.  CNU's liberal arts curriculum provides our students with the tools needed to begin the search for a career in sociology with marketable skill and knowledge. The American Sociological Association has more information about careers and graduate schools in sociology.

What is Sociology?

A broad-based social science, sociology covers a wealth of topics in the study of social behavior and human society.  While one day you may explore the influence of media messages on socialization, the next you may examine societal effects of aging.

For years, sociologists have studied social interactions and institutions, applying both information (what we know) and theory (how we explain what occurs).  Our curriculum provides a foundation for understanding the community in which you live, equipping you to participate in meaningful social change.

For more information and course descriptions, please review the Undergraduate Catalog.

What is Social Work?

Accredited by the Council on Social Work Education

Social workers spend their careers helping others, from criminal justice to the mental health field, public welfare and beyond.  Students in our accredited social work program develop the essential skills, knowledge and values of the social work professions.  The undergraduate major prepares you for beginning generalist social work practice.

The highly integrated social work curriculum includes sequence of study in social welfare policy and services, human behavior and the social environment, research and social work practice.  Coursework includes the study of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.


Social Work Major

The bachelor of arts in social work has the principal educational objective of preparing students for beginning generalist social work practice. The curriculum includes sequences of study in social welfare policy and services, human behavior and the social environment, research, and social work practice.
Coursework

•    study of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities;
•    values and ethics of the profession,
•    diversity and special populations,
•    social and economic justice
•    field instruction places students in social agencies in the community.

Graduates find employment in such area as public and private social service agencies in the fields of family and child welfare, health, mental health, drug and alcohol rehabilitation, schools, corrections, and probation.

In addition to admission as a classified student at CNU and formal declaration of social work as a major, students must still apply for "entered status" as a CNU baccalaureate social work major.  Requirements for entrance to the social work major include:

  • Completion of at least 30 hours of academic work, showing progress toward meeting CNU's general education requirements;
  • Successful completion (a grade of C or better) of SOWK 201 or acceptable equivalent, to insure at least a basic understanding of the career choice being made;
  • an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 and a GPA of at least 2.75 in all courses for social work; and
  • One reference letter, a written application, an admission statement, and possibly a personal interview and/or panel interview.

A PDF copy of the Social Work Program Student Handbook (including application materials) is available here: Social Work Student Handbook

A PDF copy of the Social Work Program of Student Learning Outcomes (CSWE Form AS4-B) is located here: Student Learning Outcomes

For more information and course descriptions, please review the Undergraduate Catalog.

Sociology

The minor in sociology requires a minimum of 18 credits in sociology. To complete the minor, students must take SOCL 201, 205, and 12 hours of additional SOCL courses at the 300 or 400 level selected in consultation with an advisor from the department.

Anthropology

The minor in anthology requires a minimum of 18 credits in anthropology.  Required courses are: 

  • ANTH 200 and 203;
  • Additional twelve hours in ANTH courses above the 200-level.

For more information and course descriptions, please review the Undergraduate Catalog.

Anthropology
The study of humankind stands at the heart of anthropology.  From the biological history of humans to our communication style, genders, cultures, societies and beyond, anthropologists explore people's origins (biological and cultural) and development in both past and contemporary variations.

Course topics range from human adaptation and cultural anthropology to specialized studies focusing on broad-based, intriguing topics like the refugee experience, food and culture, and language and culture - to name a few.

Criminology

Criminology is the scientific study of crime as a social phenomenon.   Criminologists explore the cause, extent, nature and control of criminal behavior at the individual and societal level.  Explanations of criminal behavior include biological and psychological traits, social structure, strain, cultural deviance, socialization, social learning, social control, developmental, rational choice, and conflict theories.

Our curriculum provides courses in deviant behavior, criminological theory, and specialized topics such as media and crime.  Since the study of criminology is influenced by numerous liberal arts disciplines, students also have the opportunity to take criminology related courses across the university.  

For more information and course descriptions, please review the Undergraduate Catalog.